Our Take on Fashion Month

No florals for spring? Groundbreaking.

By Marisa Dellatto

Designers wowed onlookers both in-person and online during September’s ever-illustrious fashion month. Clothes were fashioned into literal wearable art, as models strutted down the runway in everything from corsets without tops, leg-showing gowns, to  tight-necked collars. Rhyme and reason was thrown out the window, as creators ushered in creativity and brought a sense of grime and ugliness to weeks known for their glamour and finesse. Throw out your pastels. Sand, ecru, beige, and camel are the new Easter staples.

Em Mag Editor-in-Chief Adam Ward and fashion director Katya Katsnelson styled three looks inspired by the Ready-to-Wear Spring 2018 shows.

  Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

 Vaquera.

Vaquera.

VAQUERA

Vaquera’s New York show oozed uncomfortability. Models were half-adorned in clothes: a shirt without pants, lingerie and accessories, nothing more. The looks also featured costume-esque monstrosities: enormous tropical-patterned bows under dusters, torn-open Grandpa Joe robes of fabric crisscrossing the model’s body and bellowing in the wind, paired with trash bag purses. According to Women’s Wear Daily, the models walked to remixes of the soundtracks of the OC and Big Little Lies.. The stark dichotomy between the music and the looks posed Vaquera’s clear commentary on stereotypes formed by the media, said WWD. The rebellious show couldn’t have been less classically spring: no color, no flowers, no pretty little dresses.

Ward and Kastnelson’s Vaquera-inspired look was a nod to the designer’s most quintessential clothing item: the extra-extra-extra-extra large button down. The model, too small for this colossal shirt, wore the collar as a boat neck instead of pinned up. The ever-reaching tie folds the onlookers’ gaze in half. The structured dress shirt and tie were paired with conventional loafers. Did someone say “business casual?”

  Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

 Simon Porte Jaquemus.

Simon Porte Jaquemus.

SIMON PORTE JAQUEMUS

Across the Atlantic, the youthful Simon Porte Jaquemus pranced his models around the Musee Picasso, the first time the institution has been used for such an occasion, according to Vogue. Jaquemus’s show seemed to experience a stylistic “period” of its own, much like many of the Picasso works that served as scenery. Like many of his paintings that spanned from the end of his African period through the beginning of Cubism, Jaquemus seemed to borrow Piccasso’s palette of neutrals. Unlike Vaquera’s pieces, Jaquemus showed peak femininity: ruched dresses, oversized sun hats, and sleek silhouettes. The presentation was titled “La Bomba” and honored the style of his French-girl mother: sexy, fun, and island-life loving.

Em Mag’s take borrowed body-hugging shapes from the French designer. The slit skirt shows off the model’s leg, a common theme amongst Jaquemus’s spring designs. Notice the tucking detail at the bottom of the garment—the subtle volume adds a soft flair to the triangular lines of the skirt. The contrast between the black top tucked into the camel-hue fabric draws the eyes to the model’s waist. To top it all off is a larger-than life brimming hat. Magnifique.

  Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

Photo by Adam Ward. Styled by Katya Katsnelson. Model: Quincy Elliot.

 Jil Sander.

Jil Sander.

JIL SANDER

In Milan, the Jil Sander show added a fresh color to the neutrals shown in the previous two: white. Cornstarch, bleach, and steam must have clouded the backstage—every look was ironed to perfection. Playing off ideas of structure, button-up dresses and shirts stole the show. A monkish aesthetic was evident, as collarless necklines and shapeless linen outlined each model’s contor. As the show continued, more color and flow was speckled in to create a welcomed variety. Still, clean lines remained commonplace. More traditional and beautifully-plain styles were paired with mules and lace up sandals, which relaxed each arrangement and helped link the more traditional looks to the vibrant and elaborate ones.

Katsnelson and Ward played off of a menswear compilation. The leather jacket zippered to the tippy-top is a key element to the Sanders’ spring show. Its muted color and oversized sleeves build a certain structure and wideness. The dark slacks force onlookers to look up and focus on the light top. The simple geometric lines flow seamlessly from the top of the jacket to the start of the Chaco sandals. A weekender tote in the model’s hand gives context and plays off the shapes within the style.